Viet Nam

UNISDR head, Mami Mizutori, addressing the High School Students Summit for World Tsunami Awareness Day
For the third year, Japan hosted a High School Students Summit to mark World Tsunami Awareness Day. UNISDR head, Mami Mizutori, urged them to become youth ambassdors for disaster risk reduction.
Heavy rains in Somalia, coupled with disputes between clans, resulted in over four thousand IDPs seeking shelter in 2012. AU UN IST Photo / Tobin Jones
Research findings released today on International Day for Disaster Reduction forecast a continued rise in homelessness among people in the world’s most disaster prone countries unless significant progress is made in managing disaster risk.
The High School Students Summit saw 360 participants from 30 countries spotlight the issue of reducing tsunami risk (Photo: UNISDR)
Hundreds of high school students from around the world have pledged to step up efforts to reduce disaster risk, at a global gathering held to mark the first edition of World Tsunami Awareness Day.
Ms. Darin Klong Ugkara of Thai PBS recounts her experience during the huge floods of 2011 in her country (Photo: UNISDR)
Asia’s most prolific disaster risk reduction journalist has urged media colleagues from 12 other countries to move beyond simply describing events and instead help their audiences better protect themselves from various hazards.
(From left) Ms.Dang Thuy Duong, Ms. Meghna Chawla and Ms. Kartika Juwita celebrate with their trophies after being declated the three winners in the DRR Short Film competition at the closing of the AMCDRR 20016 in New Delhi. (Photo: UNISDR)
Three films of human resilience in an era of increasing disaster risk and a changing climate have scooped the main prizes at a prestigious awards ceremony. The documentaries – from Vietnam, Indonesia and India – were honoured for their insightful journalism and compelling tales of local innovation at the closing of the Asian Ministerial Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction 2016.

The paper compares and contrasts how disaster risk management is being conceptualised in relation to emerging climate change adaptation efforts and how these two agendas are influenced by different governance systems, accountabilities and social contracts

This paper aims to fill a conceptual gap and provide context for considering the rapidly changing characteristics of risk at the local level. It considers how the notion of the local might be reframed, and the opportunities for multi-scale interventions

ASEAN members' National Disaster Management Offices and their staff have been at the forefront of establishing and implementing the world’s first and only legally-binding regional framework on disaster management (Photo: UNISDR)
Greater disaster resilience at community and national level is an important element of a new era of closer integration and cooperation in Southeast Asia, a high-level ASEAN-China cooperation forum was told today.
The scene of 10 typhoons: The Furama Five-Star Resort in Da Nang takes disaster risk management seriously. (Photo: UNISDR)
An industry which is literally on the front line of disaster and climate risk is emerging as a leader in efforts to strengthen resilience in one of Viet Nam’s prime tourist destinations.
The Director of Da Nang Climate Change Coordination Office Dr Dinh Quang Cuong explains the city’s significant flood risk (Photo: UNISDR)
The Sendai Framework identifies partnership with the private sector as a vital element in global efforts to reduce disaster risk. This strategic and inclusive approach is already a reality in hazard-prone Da Nang, on Viet Nam’s Central Coast.