Equatorial Guinea

Equatorial Guinea cover page

This report provides an analysis of public investment planning for disaster risk reduction (DRR) and the level of public investment in DRR in Equatorial Guinea. It does this by means of a risk-sensitive budget review (RSBR) that applies the OECD DAC DRR

This country risk profile for Equatorial Guinea provides a comprehensive view of hazard, risk and uncertainties for floods and droughts in a changing climate, with projections for the period 2050-2100. The risk assessment considers a large number of

The dry and arid region of Isiola in Kenya where droughts are recurrent. Photo ©EU/ECHO/Martin Karimi
The United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction has engaged CIMA Research Foundation to generate risk profiles on flood and drought in 16 countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. The countries that will be involved in the risk assessment are: Angola, Equatorial Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Rwanda, Swaziland, Tanzania, Ivory Coast, Botswana, Zambia, Namibia, Gambia, Gabon, Cameroon, Ghana, Sao Tome and Principe, and Kenya.
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Ministry of Fisheries and Environment
United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction - Regional Office for Africa
Malabo
In June 2015, floods caused by heavy rain in Douala, Cameroon’s economic capital, killed at least four people, displaced some 2,000 people and destroyed the homes and businesses of thousands of others (Photo: Sylvestre Tetchiada/IRIN)
Collective action by regional organisations is a key means to help countries reduce their risk of disasters, and the Economic Community of Central African States is stepping up its efforts to rein in the impact of hazards amid rising pressure from climate change.

This study examines areas in Africa, South America and the Arab region subject to different levels of both land degradation (LD) and agricultural drought hazard (ADH). The authors estimate crop losses related to the impacts of drought and land degradation

Flooding is one of the main natural hazards affecting Central African countries. Here, residents evacuate in the Mutakura district of Burundi's capital Bujumbura, in February 2014 (Photo: Desire Nimubona/IRIN)
Members of parliament from across Central Africa are stepping up their region’s drive to curb the impact of natural and man-made hazards by implementing the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction.
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United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change
International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies
United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs - Headquarters
Economic Community of Central African States
United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction - Regional Office for Africa
Douala
As the 17th Ordinary Session of the Assembly of the African Union wrapped up in Malabo, Guinea, talks of a common voice on sustainable development have continued to dominate agendas in Africa ahead of the United Nations climate talks to be held in Durban in December. The need to address the issue of disasters and climate change continues to at the fore of various platforms of implementing the extended Africa Regional Strategy for Disaster Risk Reduction.

This inventory is an attempt to pull together the threads and to identify what does and what does not work in relation to legal, institutional and planning frameworks for disaster risk reduction (DRR) in Africa. It aims to further support the