Cameroon

Cameroon cover page

This report presents an analysis of public investment planning and financing strategy for disaster risk reduction (DRR) in Cameroon, as part of UNDRR’s programme “Building Disaster Resilience to Natural Hazards in Sub-Saharan African Regions, Countries

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European Commission
United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction - Office in Incheon for Northeast Asia and Global Education and Training Institute for Disaster Risk Reduction
Incheon

This country risk profile for Cameroon provides a comprehensive view of hazard, risk and uncertainties for floods and droughts in a changing climate, with projections for the period 2050-2100. The risk assessment considers a large number of possible

City leaders and disaster risk planners in Africa share experience on inclusive resilience at a progress workshop under the Making Cities Resilient Campaign in Nairobi.
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Economic Community of Central African States
United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction - Regional Office for Africa
African Union Commission
Yaoundé
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United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction - Office in Incheon for Northeast Asia and Global Education and Training Institute for Disaster Risk Reduction
National Civil Defense and Disaster Management Institute
Korea International Cooperation Agency
Incheon
The dry and arid region of Isiola in Kenya where droughts are recurrent. Photo ©EU/ECHO/Martin Karimi
The United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction has engaged CIMA Research Foundation to generate risk profiles on flood and drought in 16 countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. The countries that will be involved in the risk assessment are: Angola, Equatorial Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Rwanda, Swaziland, Tanzania, Ivory Coast, Botswana, Zambia, Namibia, Gambia, Gabon, Cameroon, Ghana, Sao Tome and Principe, and Kenya.
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United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction - Office in Incheon for Northeast Asia and Global Education and Training Institute for Disaster Risk Reduction
National Civil Defense and Disaster Management Institute
Korea International Cooperation Agency
Incheon
Rescuers work at the scene of the rubbish dump landslide in Addis Ababa (Photo: AP/Mulugeta Ayene)
Rising disasters in Africa’s cities and their links with poverty and rapid, unplanned urbanisation are ever more apparent from tragedies such as the recent rubbish dump landslide in Addis Ababa, which killed at least 113 people.
In June 2015, floods caused by heavy rain in Douala, Cameroon’s economic capital, killed at least four people, displaced some 2,000 people and destroyed the homes and businesses of thousands of others (Photo: Sylvestre Tetchiada/IRIN)
Collective action by regional organisations is a key means to help countries reduce their risk of disasters, and the Economic Community of Central African States is stepping up its efforts to rein in the impact of hazards amid rising pressure from climate change.