Cameroon

Thanks to the ‘Making Cities Sustainable and Resilient’ initiative, Yaoundé Six, Cameroon, has developed a disaster risk reduction action plan to enhance living conditions in its informal settlements.
Africa SFM News April 2021

On 31 March 2021 Member States were invited to reflect 2020 data for Targets A, B, C, D & E in the Sendai Framework Monitor. This milestone was particularly important as countries were invited to reflect Covid 19 data for the first time and to report on

guidance note on use of risk profiles cover

In 2018, as part of the “Building Disaster Resilience to Natural Hazards in Sub-Saharan African Regions, Countries and Communities” programme, UNDRR, with the help of CIMA Research Foundation, VU Amsterdam, and Wageningen University and Research developed

Cameroon cover page

This report presents an analysis of public investment planning and financing strategy for disaster risk reduction (DRR) in Cameroon, as part of UNDRR’s programme “Building Disaster Resilience to Natural Hazards in Sub-Saharan African Regions, Countries

This country risk profile for Cameroon provides a comprehensive view of hazard, risk and uncertainties for floods and droughts in a changing climate, with projections for the period 2050-2100. The risk assessment considers a large number of possible

City leaders and disaster risk planners in Africa share experience on inclusive resilience at a progress workshop under the Making Cities Resilient Campaign in Nairobi.
The dry and arid region of Isiola in Kenya where droughts are recurrent. Photo ©EU/ECHO/Martin Karimi
The United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction has engaged CIMA Research Foundation to generate risk profiles on flood and drought in 16 countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. The countries that will be involved in the risk assessment are: Angola, Equatorial Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Rwanda, Swaziland, Tanzania, Ivory Coast, Botswana, Zambia, Namibia, Gambia, Gabon, Cameroon, Ghana, Sao Tome and Principe, and Kenya.
Rescuers work at the scene of the rubbish dump landslide in Addis Ababa (Photo: AP/Mulugeta Ayene)
Rising disasters in Africa’s cities and their links with poverty and rapid, unplanned urbanisation are ever more apparent from tragedies such as the recent rubbish dump landslide in Addis Ababa, which killed at least 113 people.
In June 2015, floods caused by heavy rain in Douala, Cameroon’s economic capital, killed at least four people, displaced some 2,000 people and destroyed the homes and businesses of thousands of others (Photo: Sylvestre Tetchiada/IRIN)
Collective action by regional organisations is a key means to help countries reduce their risk of disasters, and the Economic Community of Central African States is stepping up its efforts to rein in the impact of hazards amid rising pressure from climate change.
Post-earthquake reconstruction efforts get underway in Nepal (Photo: International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies)
The UN Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR) and the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-Habitat) aim to reduce disaster losses in some of the world’s most hazard prone cities with the initial aid of a €6 million grant from the EU, over the next three years.