Burundi

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The thematic report presents the first baseline for displacement risk associated with sudden-onset disasters in the countries of the Greater Horn of Africa with the ultimate aim of reducing future displacement risk. As sudden-onset natural hazards

Participants at the East African Community (EAC) Parliamentarian Forum on disaster risk reduction have pledged to step up the region's efforts to curb hazard impacts (Photo: UNISDR)
Members of parliament from the six-nation East African Community have vowed to step up a drive to implement the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction in their region.
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East African Community Secretariat
United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction - Regional Office for Africa
Mombasa
Drought in Ethiopia has led to successive failed harvests and widespread livestock deaths in some areas (Photo: WFP/Melese Awoke)
Already grappling with an extended dry spell, countries in Greater Horn of Africa are bracing for an even deeper drought, with the approach of the traditional March to May rainy season offering little cause for comfort.
In June 2015, floods caused by heavy rain in Douala, Cameroon’s economic capital, killed at least four people, displaced some 2,000 people and destroyed the homes and businesses of thousands of others (Photo: Sylvestre Tetchiada/IRIN)
Collective action by regional organisations is a key means to help countries reduce their risk of disasters, and the Economic Community of Central African States is stepping up its efforts to rein in the impact of hazards amid rising pressure from climate change.

This working paper analyses the objectives and rationale of tracking public investments on disaster risk reduction (DRR). The document also looks into the methodologies adopted for tracking public investments for various cross-cutting issues and reviews

Flooding is one of the main natural hazards affecting Central African countries. Here, residents evacuate in the Mutakura district of Burundi's capital Bujumbura, in February 2014 (Photo: Desire Nimubona/IRIN)
Members of parliament from across Central Africa are stepping up their region’s drive to curb the impact of natural and man-made hazards by implementing the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction.
Members of the East Africa Legislative Assembly in session during the debate on the Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Bill (Photo: EALA)
East African countries have reached a landmark in their efforts to curb the impact of natural and man-made hazards, by enacting regional legislation on the management and reduction of disaster risk.

This report aims to provide a thematic review on risk governance in Africa as a contribution to the 2015 Global Assessment Report on Disaster Risk Reduction (GAR 2015). It identifies achievements, good practices, gaps and challenges against selected