Overview

The UNDRR liaison office in Japan works closely with the Japanese Government and other institutions that have extensive experience and expertise in disaster risk reduction (DRR) to support other partners around the world to reduce disaster risk and build resilience.

The office looks after the Sendai Framework Voluntary Commitments online platform so that non-governmental stakeholders can also contribute to and be recognised for their efforts in implementing the Sendai Framework. 

The office also promotes collaboration with Japan-based institutions such as government agencies, academic and research institutions, the private sector, and civil societies, facilitating their contribution to global and regional DRR efforts and linking their experiences, technology and innovation to other countries’ and regions’ needs.

Contact us

DRI-East 5F
1-5-2 Wakinohama-Kaigan-dori
Chuo-ku
Hyogo
651-0073
Kobe-City, Japan
Phone: +81 782625550
isdr-hyogo@un.org

News and events

Student teachers visiting the exhibition space at Arahama Elementary School in Sendai, Japan, for World Tsunami Awareness Day
A former elementary school on the coast of Japan has been turned into a centre for raising awareness about tsunami risk. It saved the lives of 320 people who evacuated to its roof top.
Mother and child safe on the top of a Sendai tsunami evacuation tower in today's evacuation exercise
The Sendai area of Japan which was badly affected by the 2011 tsunami today marked World Tsunami Awareness Day with a major exercise along its vulnerable coastline.
Fumihiko Imamura, Professor of Tsunami Engineering at Tohoko University
Renowned tsunami expert Prof. Fumihiko Imamura uses the occasion of World Tsunami Awareness Day to draw attention to the threat of "black tsunamis" caused by pollution of the seas
A screenshot from the voluntary commitment platform which will be launched on 31 December 2018.
The United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction is launching an online platform which allows partners to log their voluntary commitments towanrds implementation of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction.
Group photo of participants at the 2nd World Tsunami Museum Conference
Japan hosted the 2nd World Tsunami Museum Conference which attracted 156 participants from 17 countries to help raise awareness of tsunami risk.
María Fernanda Espinosa Garcés, President of the UN General Assembly, opening the tsunami panel discussion at UN HQ in New York.
At a meeting in UN HQ to mark the 3rd edition of World Tsunami Awareness Day, there were repeated calls for greater attention to the needs of those most vulnerable in disaster situations.
UNISDR head, Mami Mizutori, addressing the High School Students Summit for World Tsunami Awareness Day
For the third year, Japan hosted a High School Students Summit to mark World Tsunami Awareness Day. UNISDR head, Mami Mizutori, urged them to become youth ambassdors for disaster risk reduction.
UNISDR head, Mami Mizutori, speaking at the GEO-XV Plenary
The UN Secretary-General's Special Representative for Disaster Risk Reduction, Mami Mizutori, gave the keynote speech at the GEO-XV Plenary as part of GEO Week 2018, in Kyoto, Japan yesterday.
The lessons learned from this week's floods and landslides in Japan and other similar events need to be applied if we are to succeed in reducing loss of life and the numbers of people affected by disasters.
This tsunami buoy undergoing inspection in Indonesia is part of the Indian Ocean tsunami warning system introduced after the 2004 tsunami
Mongolia may be landlocked but yesterday Ulaanbaatar was home to a special session on tsunami awareness at the Asian Ministerial Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction.

Publications

From the 19th to 21st of August 2014, the city of Hiroshima in Japan experienced a torrential rainfall triggering 166 landslides, which led to 107 debris flows and 59 shallow slides. These landslides were compounded by flash flooding. The consequence of

On 11 March 2011, the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami severely damaged the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP). Large radioactivity released induced multi-hazard disasters on human livelihoods and ecosystems in the Fukushima

The goal of this paper is to examine how government continuity planning contributes to strengthening the public sector’s disaster preparedness, resulting in enhanced resilience of the public sector. The paper analyzes basic principles of government

In the aftermath of disasters, local governments are primarily responsible for implementing quick recovery programs, including the relocation of affected people from areas at risk to safer places, rehabilitation of destroyed infrastructure, as well as the

Developing countries in general and those in Asia, in particular, have become producers of goods and services for rest of the world as a result of which investments in the region have grown significantly. But before the advent of global investments, the

This paper provides a timely review of progress and ongoing research needs in tsunami hazard and risk science since the most recent major event, the Tohoku tsunami in 2011. The tsunami community has made significant progress in understanding tsunami

Okinawa, Japan, located southwest of the country, is heavily dependent on tourism, the largest economic sector in the region. Following the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami in 2011, the Okinawa Prefectural Government launched the Tourism Crisis

In December 2015, a resolution jointly proposed by 142 countries including Japan on the creation of a World Tsunami Awareness Day, was adopted by consensus at the 70th Session of the United Nations General Assembly. The objectives of the World Tsunami

This document attempts to fill knowledge gaps regarding the role of the private sector in disaster recovery and draws from the wider body of knowledge and from documented experiences of past and present disaster planning and recovery. This guide is

This paper discusses the important of the human rights-based approach regarding public health for the reduction of disaster risk in Japan. The authors also underline the fact that transboundary cooperation is necessary to prepare for mega-disasters.

Th

DRR in Japan

The Hyogo prefecture went through a dramatic recovery process after the Great Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake (the Kobe Earthquake) in January 1995, that killed more than 6,400 people. Through the experiences and lessons learned, Hyogo led research, education and international cooperation on DRR. 

In January 2005, the World Conference on Disaster Reduction (WCDR) was organized by UNDRR (then ISDR) in Kobe, where more than 168 Governments adopted the “Hyogo Framework for Action 2005-2015: building the resilience of nations and communities to disasters” (HFA). The ten-year plan served as the main policy guidance for countries to develop policies on disaster risk reduction.

Building on this process, “The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030" was adopted as the HFA’s successor at the Third UN World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction (WCDRR), held in Sendai in March 2015.