Overview

Sendai Framework Monitoring
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Strong accountability is one of the corner stones of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction. The UNDRR Office in Bonn supports the monitoring process of the implementation of the Sendai Framework though seven targets and 38 indicators as well as its related dimensions reflected in the Sustainable Development Goals 1, 11 and 13.

The UNDRR Bonn office provides guidance to the Regional Offices for enhanced support to governments as they report on progress in reducing loss of life, numbers of people affected by disasters, economic losses and damage to critical infrastructure.  It provides this support engagement with a number of technical organizations within and outside of the UN and through technical guidance documentation, training packages and other data related initiatives.

Climate Change and Coherence
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UNDRR Bonn enables countries to identify progress in the implementation of DRR related targets and indicators of the SDGs, while fostering coherence between DRR and climate change adaptation efforts. The Bonn Office will build on ongoing efforts at national and local levels to further promote coherence in the implementation of global frameworks. By creating synergies in implementing Sendai Framework Target e and the National Adaptation Plans (NAPs), countries have an opportunity to ensure coherence between disaster risk reduction, climate action and sustainable development policies and practices.
 

News and events

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The city of Tashkent, Uzbekistan, and UNDRR have embarked on a partnership to assess the resilience of the capital city and to develop a comprehensive plan of action to reduce risk. Mr. B. Rakhmanqulov, Deputy Mayor of Tashkent, the largest city in
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Two recommendations of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction have been put into practice with the adoption of a new law in France: the necessity of including science in the policy-making process, and the importance of the local level insights
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Belarus and Moldova are the first countries to undergo an independent multi-stakeholder assessment coordinated by the UN Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNDRR) to ensure that national disaster risk reduction strategies are inclusive, robust, and in
Participants at meeting of European Sendai Framework focal points and civil protection representatives
European countries move closer to aligning their civil protection agendas with implementation of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction.
A wide angle view of the plenary session to declare open the Global Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction
Representatives from some 150 UN Member States attended the opening today of the Global Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction
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The United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction and KLP, Norway's largest pension company, announced today a partnership to geo-tag financial investments against vulnerability to disaster and climate risk.
Montenegro disaster resilience
Major efforts are underway in Montenegro to reduce the risks from disasters with the launch of a national disaster loss database to mark the 40th anniversary of a major earthquake.
Group photo of participants at the 2nd World Tsunami Museum Conference
Japan hosted the 2nd World Tsunami Museum Conference which attracted 156 participants from 17 countries to help raise awareness of tsunami risk.
At today's launch: (from left) Permanent Representative Vojislav Šuc, Slovenia, Kirsi Madi, UNISDR, and Rudolf Müller, OCHA
UNISDR and partners today launched an "Implementation Guide for Man-made and Technological Hazards" to support implementation of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030.
UNISDR head, Mami Mizutori, addressing the closing ceremony today of the European Forum for Disaster Risk Reduction
The Rome Declaration was adopted today at the close of the European Forum on Disaster Risk Reduction, spelling out the challenges facing the region.

Publications

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UNDRR INFO, is the regional office for Europe's monthly newsletter covering activities in the field of DRR.  This month's edition includes updates on: The European Green Deal, glass flood barriers in the Netherlands,Agroforestry and the reduction of

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Climate change is a major driver of disaster losses and failed development. It amplifies risk and increases the intensity and frequency of natural hazards. It is changing the way we live, impacting the way societies function, in Europe and beyond. In the

Within the Programme “Building Disaster Resilience to Natural Hazards in Sub-Saharan African Regions, Countries and Communities ”, UNDRR and CIMA Research Foundation organized a five-day Study Tour in Europe – namely Italy and Brussels - for members of

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The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 guides Member States in reflecting on their own systems for disaster risk management and to foster disaster risk reduction efforts at national and local level. The first priority of the

The UK’s Increasing Resilience to Natural Hazards (IRNH) Programme was established in 2010 to support science-led research aiming to increase social and economic resilience in earthquake-prone and volcanic regions. IRNH marked a new direction for

The problem of increasing the efficiency of the hydrometeorological provision of the population and industrial enterprises is directly related to the digital transformation of support facilities and the National Hydrometeorological Services themselves. It

The present work describes the experience of the Province of Potenza (an Italian local authority of subnational level) in accomplishing the recent UN global agreements goals and targets and in particular illustrates:

  • Progresses made in implementing

Climate change is likely to multiply the impacts of flooding the UK already faces, therefore further action must be taken to tackle both flood and climate risks to protect society, the economy and the environment. Disaster risk reduction (DRR) and climate

Risk is widely conceptualized as a factor of hazards, exposure and vulnerability. One critical component of the risk equation is geography. The physical location of people and assets very much defines the likelihood and impact of a specific hazard which

Various risk assessments in the context of climate change examine changes in climatic conditions and respective hazards e.g. for the year 2030, 2050 and 2100, but juxtapose this information with data on vulnerability referring to the present. This is a