Small Island Developing States (SIDS)

Opening remarks SRSG Mami Mizutori 4th Meeting of the Small Island States Resilience Initiative ‘Bringing Resilience to Scale in SIDS’ 09.00 Sunday 12 May 2019 Room C1 WMO 7bis Avenue de la Paix Delegates & representatives from Small Islands Developing
In the face of growing disaster losses and risk in the Asia-Pacific region, government disaster risk management agencies, international organizations, and civil society groups met in the Australian city of Brisbane last week to agree on priorities for accelerating action for reducing the risk of disasters.
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United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction – Regional Office for the Americas and the Caribbean
Office of Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Management
Jamaica - government
Kingston

The Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) report provides a snapshot of the latest DRR progress Papua New Guinea (PNG) has achieved under the four priorities of the Sendai Framework. It also highlights some of the key challenges surrounding the issue of

The Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) report provides a snapshot of the latest DRR progress Maldives has achieved under the four priorities of the Sendai Framework. It also highlights some of the key challenges surrounding the issue of creating coherence

The Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) report provides a latest snapshot of the DRR progress the Republic of Fiji has achieved under the four priorities of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction. It also highlights some of the key challenges

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UN Office for Disaster Risk Reduction, Office in Incheon for Northeast Asia and Global Education and Training Institute for Disaster Risk Reduction
Singapore Cooperation Programme
Ministry of Foreign Affairs (Singapore)
National Emergency Management Organisation
ARISE
United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction – Regional Office for the Americas and the Caribbean
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United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction – Regional Office for the Americas and the Caribbean
Montego Bay

Volcanic ash is an excellent archetype of an ‘extensive hazard’. Ash fall occurs frequently and intermittently during volcanic eruptions, and populations in close proximity to persistently-active volcanoes report ash impacts and distribution that have