Inclusion

United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction – Regional Office for the Americas and the Caribbean
Panama City
Pupils at a classroom in Balon school, Vanuatu
Resilient infrastructure protects people during disasters and enables communities to recover quickly in the immediate aftermath of a crisis. Two examples from Vanuatu during and after Tropical Cyclone Harold – a Category 5 storm – illustrate the point
Cherol returning from her mission through open ocean
The immense challenges resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic have not stopped efforts to protect the health and rights of women and girls in remote areas in Fiji, Tonga, and Vanuatu. That said, pandemic-related lockdowns and movement restrictions have
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United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction - Regional Office for Asia and Pacific
Bangkok
Panelists of  Second PRP webinar
Suva –Local wisdom, ownership and leadership are critical factors for effective humanitarian action in support of communities exposed and vulnerable to climate and disaster risk. Preparedness and response planning need to be more collaborative and
The 2011 East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami that triggered the Fukushima nuclear disaster is an example of types cascading disasters that Asia-Pacific Regional Framework for NATECH attempts to guard against.
In the context of growing disaster risks in the region, which are becoming more complex, the 2020 Asia Pacific Science and Technology Conference for Disaster Risk Reduction took on increased importance as government officials and researchers tackled the key risks facing the region.
Chair and panelists of the inaugural webinar of PRP
Suva – In light of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, coupled with sudden and slow disasters, Fiji, the Republic of Marshall Islands (RMI) and Tuvalu are re-examining how their laws can be updated to better reflect the increasing complexity of disasters
Agnes Titus, Nazareth Centre for Rehabilitation in Bougainville
In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, women leaders in the Pacific have been able to carve a larger space to bring the voices and perspectives of women and girls to the policy tables and influence disaster preparedness and response. Ms Agnes Titus, of
Cover of report showing a local leaders leading a preparedness exercise.

Disaster risks are growing more intense, complex, and unpredictable. This growing unpredictability and intensity of extreme events, in the midst of increasingly complex socio-economic dynamics fuelled by growing inequalities, call for a new approach to

United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction – Regional Office for the Americas and the Caribbean
ARISE