Early Warning

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United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction – Regional Office for the Americas and the Caribbean
The Climate Risk & Early Warning Systems Initiative
Port of Spain, Trinidad
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This study presents an important opportunity to explore the challenges and potential associated with better understanding and managing of compound, cascading and systemic risks in the Asia Pacific region.
Cover inclusive MHEWS
This report aims to support governments and partners in developing inclusive and accessible MHEWS by drawing on lessons from the success of a number of women-led and disability-inclusive MHEWS established in the Pacific Region
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We are grateful to the World Meteorological Organization for collaboration toward the important goal of mitigating risk from climate and change and extreme weather.
EWS
The development of Early Warning Systems has been identified by the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015–2030, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, and the Paris Agreement as a key pathway to prevent disasters.
Dili, Timor-Leste inundated with flood waters following Cyclone Seroja
Floods of 2021 in Timor-Leste presented opportunities to build back better in recovery efforts thanks to international support from countries like Australia.
An Asian man draws a plan for the development of a sustainable city.
On 19 January, the International Recovery Forum 2022 concluded with a strong call to prioritize preparedness for recovery and invest in resilience before a disaster strikes.
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UNDRR, UN-SPIDER from UNOOSA and the WMO invite partners and stakeholder to share good practices on lessons learned on Multi-hazard Early Warning Systems.
Application of disaster-loss data to support early warning and early action in Africa
This project seeks to support DRR stakeholders in Malawi, Zambia, Mozambique and UR Tanzania, to increase the collection and application of disaster loss data and of risk information in the context of EW-EA. This requires a well-functioning data-ecosystem, where data supply and demand of impact data are balanced among the different actors involved, with adequate governance mechanisms and data infrastructure.
Caption: ‘Protection Zone’ consisting of concrete walls and demountable flood barriers at the low-lying fishing village of Tai O in Lantau Island, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China.
For the urban coastal city of Hong Kong, typhoons are a regular occurrence from May to October. Consequently, Hong Kong’s infrastructure is designed to cope with the strong winds, floods, and storm surges they bring. Recently, however, the territory experienced two powerful storms in consecutive years. In 2017, Super Typhoon Hato struck the region, and in the following year, the city witnessed Super Typhoon Mangkhut, the strongest typhoon since 1983. But Hong Kong suffered lower economic losses from both storms when compared with the neighboring Guangdong region and the city of Macau, thanks partly to its well-coordinated response and resilient infrastructure.