Critical Infrastructure

Group photo of PARTneR event in Samoa
New Zealand's The Pacific Risk Tool for Resilience (PARTneR) project aims to tailor a multi-hazard risk analysis tool to inform disaster risk management in Pacific Island countries, with pilots in Samoa and Vanuatu.
This image visualized a communication and infrastructure net in a city.
Representatives from over 100 countries moved towards finalizing the Principles for Resilient Infrastructure, which set a new global standard for strengthening infrastructure systems and critical services such as energy, transport, water, and others.
TerminusDB
ARISE
Making Cities Resilient 2030 (MCR2030)
United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction - Office in Incheon for Northeast Asia and Global Education and Training Institute for Disaster Risk Reduction
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United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction – Regional Office for the Americas and the Caribbean
Ministry of Education, Culture, Youth and Sport of Sint Maarten
United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization - Headquarters
European Commission Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection DG
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines - government
United Nations Children's Fund
Caribbean Disaster Emergency Management Agency
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United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction - Regional Office for Arab States
Qatar - government
Cover
The draft Summary of the Principles for Resilient Infrastructure has been prepared for the Global Consultation on the Principles for Resilient Infrastructure being held on 28 & 29 March 2022.
Dili, Timor-Leste inundated with flood waters following Cyclone Seroja
Floods of 2021 in Timor-Leste presented opportunities to build back better in recovery efforts thanks to international support from countries like Australia.
China - government
United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction - Regional Office for Asia and Pacific
International Recovery Platform
United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction - Office in Japan
United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction
Asian Disaster Reduction Center
Cabinet Office (Japan)
Hyogo Prefectural Government
Kobe
Caption: ‘Protection Zone’ consisting of concrete walls and demountable flood barriers at the low-lying fishing village of Tai O in Lantau Island, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China.
For the urban coastal city of Hong Kong, typhoons are a regular occurrence from May to October. Consequently, Hong Kong’s infrastructure is designed to cope with the strong winds, floods, and storm surges they bring. Recently, however, the territory experienced two powerful storms in consecutive years. In 2017, Super Typhoon Hato struck the region, and in the following year, the city witnessed Super Typhoon Mangkhut, the strongest typhoon since 1983. But Hong Kong suffered lower economic losses from both storms when compared with the neighboring Guangdong region and the city of Macau, thanks partly to its well-coordinated response and resilient infrastructure.