Features

AMC Resilience Hubs
Campinas, Medellin, and Mexico City became the first three cities in the Americas and the Caribbean region to be recognized as "Resilience Hubs" of the Making Cities Resilient 2030 (MCR2030) initiative. The announcement was made on December 21, 2021, closing the first year of the MCR2030 initiative's activities.  These cities became Resilience Hubs for their commitment as well as progressive policy and advocacy work to address disaster and climate risks. They will serve as Resilience Hubs for the next three years continue developing their disaster resilience while inspiring other cities to do the same.
The Central Asia Initiative of the EU during the COVID-19 crisis
While COVID-19 keeps challenging all five countries of Central Asia at an unprecedented scale, through existing programs, the European Union supports both resilient and sustainable political and economic frameworks that can prepare governments for future emergencies.
Caption: ‘Protection Zone’ consisting of concrete walls and demountable flood barriers at the low-lying fishing village of Tai O in Lantau Island, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China.
For the urban coastal city of Hong Kong, typhoons are a regular occurrence from May to October. Consequently, Hong Kong’s infrastructure is designed to cope with the strong winds, floods, and storm surges they bring. Recently, however, the territory experienced two powerful storms in consecutive years. In 2017, Super Typhoon Hato struck the region, and in the following year, the city witnessed Super Typhoon Mangkhut, the strongest typhoon since 1983. But Hong Kong suffered lower economic losses from both storms when compared with the neighboring Guangdong region and the city of Macau, thanks partly to its well-coordinated response and resilient infrastructure.
Tsunami ready program
While tsunamis are not common in the Caribbean – the last major one hit 75 years ago – people are well aware of the impact of storm surges and quick to get on board with the “Tsunami Ready” program.
Team building during regional women's leadership training
The 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami spurred a movement to develop female community leaders in Japan.
Cruise ships are steaming back to Caribbean ports, airlines are ramping up flights and the vaccine roll-out is underway but it could still be several years before countries recuperate from the pandemic that has rocked the region, say experts.
Despite the deep scars left by the crisis, countries now have a fresh focus on health, resilience and regionalism plus a chance to fully incorporate disaster risk reduction into their recovery.
mangrove trees that were hit by the Tsunami several years ago on a beach in the Aceh Indonesia
In the wake of the 2004 tsunami, coastal forests helped dampen damage from the tsunami. Building on this, an Indonesian NGO called 'Yagasu' are using mangroves to bolster ecosystem-based disaster risk reduction, improve local livelihood, and aid in climate change mitigation and adaptation.
mcr curso
Municipal officials working in urban development and planning, environmental management, civil defense, health, social affairs, among others, now have another way to discover and master the tools of the Making Cities Resilient 2030 (MCR2030) initiative
Connect RN
The second Panel of the International Forum “Connect RN” on “Paving the way to Resilient and Sustainable Cities” explored how Latin American and European cities are innovating to become more resilient and sustainable in face of the global challenges posed
This calls on countries to target risk-informed development and resilience by adopting and implementing national and local strategies that include comprehensive goals, indicators and timeframes.
Despite logistical hurdles thrown up by the pandemic, the all-encompassing disaster risk reduction strategies countries are steadily putting in place are already helping build resilience and score gains against international targets.