Dominican Republic

Thanks to the ‘Making Cities Sustainable and Resilient’ initiative, a new DRR action plan was developed in La Isla to establish a clear picture of zoning in the city, which helps regulate where people can build and where to invest in drainage infrastructure.
Hurricane Mitch at peak intensity on October 26, 1998 at 19:15 UTC. At the time, it was a Category 5 hurricane. (Credit: NOAA/NASA Satellite image)
The Americas Regional Platform had a wide-ranging discussion on the development of disaster risk reduction in Central America since Hurricane Mitch twenty years ago.
PM Dominica, Roosevelt Skerrit (left), meeting with UN Secretary-General, António Guterres in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria - UN Photo/Rick Bajomas
Following the devastation wrought on his Caribbean island home by Hurricane Maria, the Prime Minister of Dominica, Mr. Roosevelt Skerrit, is calling on the world not “to turn its back” on the problem of climate change and for greater investment in disaster risk reduction.
Participants display their certificates as trainers in disaster risk reduction planning (Photo: UNISDR)
Dozens of disaster risk management professionals from across the Americas have been schooled in how to pass on planning skills, thanks to a programme run by UNISDR’s Global Education and Training Institute.
This paper argues that a human rights-based approach (HRBA), i.e. participation in political life, consultation of affected groups in decision-making processes, access to justice, due process, transparency and accountability, provides excellent tools towards a real positive change in disaster risk reduction (DRR), climate change adaptation and mitigation. The publication analyses case studies in Brazil, Dominican Republic, Ethiopia and Nepal.
Mr.  Adriel Brathwaite, Chairman of the CDEMA Council of Ministers (right), presents the award to Mr. Jeremy Collymore, former Executive Director, CDEMA (centre), alongside its current Executive Director, Mr. Ronald Jackson (left)
The Caribbean Disaster Emergency Management Agency is introducing a new awards scheme to recognise distinction in reducing disaster risk including the Jeremy Collymore Award for Research in Disaster Response and Disaster Risk Management.
José Corral, mayor Santa Fe, Argentina, sharing his city's experience in combating urban flooding.
A new global framework for disaster risk reduction (DRR) must seek to strengthen the role of local government because the impact of all disasters is local, the 4th Session of the Americas Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction heard on Wednesday.
Hurricane Sandy left its mark on the Dominican Republic in 2012 but the country is determined to strengthen its future resilience.
The Dominican Republic has adopted a new ‘National Plan for Comprehensive Disaster Risk Management’. The President of the Dominican Republic, Danilo Medina, approved the plan that will define policy guidelines and basic principles for public and private institutions and civil society organizations. The plan focuses on the implementation of programmes that reduce disaster risk, ensure the safety of citizens and protect the country’s economic, social, environmental and cultural heritage.
Bahía de las Águilas, a natural attraction located in the earthquake-prone Enriquillo region where local mayors consider disaster risk reduction is essential to supporting the growth of tourism. Photo by Matt Hinsa
Panama, 23 July 2012 - Concern about earthquakes and tsunamis brought together 33 Mayors in the Dominican Republic this month to express their support for the UNISDR “Making Cities Resilient” campaign and to demand budgetary support from central government for disaster risk reduction measures in their cities and towns.
Morphology of Kick'em Jenny volcano, as revealed by a multi-beam survey by the NOAA Ship Ron Brown in March 2002. The survey shows that the modern cone of the volcano is nested within a larger horseshoe-shaped depression formed by slope failure. (Photo / NOAA)
The magnitude 4.0 earthquake recorded off the coast of Antigua on 11 May is "a warning that the Caribbean should prepare for a much more severe earthquake to come," says a leading expert.