Overview

UNDRR’s New York liaison office (NYLO) provides policy advice and support to Member and Observer States and other stakeholders, engages closely with the office of the Secretary-General and coordinates the UN system to advance disaster risk reduction and Sendai Framework  implementation.

NYLO promotes policy coherence across disaster risk reduction, climate action and sustainable development through intergovernmental deliberations and policy decisions taken at the General Assembly and ECOSOC. NYLO ensures DRR integration in the major inter-governmental agreements, including the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, the SDGs and the Addis Ababa Action Agenda, to ensure their implementation benefits from and contributes to reducing disaster risk.

Speeches

Social protection through cash assistance in the Philippines
BANGKOK – The Asia-Pacific region can benefit from scaling-up investment in social protection to reduce the impact of the COVID-19 crisis, maintain social cohesion and reduce overall vulnerabilities. Those were some of the insights from a webinar
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The inevitable impact of COVID 19 and its impact globally and on all Arab countries is far more than a health crisis, it is affecting societies and economies in multiple ways. While the impact of the pandemic varies from one country to another, it will
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As the first region to be impacted by COVID-19, Asia-Pacific has become the testing ground for innovations and solutions to tackle this global disaster. UNDRR’s Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific will be organizing over the coming weeks a series of
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BANGKOK - The Regional Office for Asia and Pacific of the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNDRR), in collaboration with the Asian Disaster Preparedness Center (ADPC), announces the launch of an online training course to help small and
Mami Mizutori, UN Secretary-General's Special Representative for Disaster Risk Reductiion
Statement delivered by the UN Secretary-General's Special Representative for Disaster Risk Reduction, Mami Mizutori, to a webinar on the Human Rights Dimensions of the COVID-19 Pandemic, hosted by UNDRR's Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific
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GENEVA - Widespread abuse of migrant workers and multiple examples of human rights violations were vividly highlighted by experts in the Asia and the Pacific Region speaking in a UNDRR-hosted webinar on “Human Rights Dimensions of the COVID-19 pandemic”
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BANGKOK - The COVID-19 pandemic poses unique challenges in response and recovery. Governments are trying to manage the shock in the face of existing societal threats like poverty and inequality. Nevertheless, the COVID-19 recovery process has the
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Over 30 European and Central Asia member states joined a successful virtual dialogue Wednesday 6 May on “Sharing Experiences and Strategies for COVID-19 Response, Transition, and Resilience," The dialogue, co-organized by the UN Office for Disaster Risk
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GENEVA - The buzz-word of the post-COVID-19 recovery is likely to be “resilience.” That’s the forecast of former UN Deputy Secretary-General, Lord Mark Malloch-Brown in discussion with the UN Secretary-General’s Special Representative for Disaster Risk
UNDRR Web on SMEs
The United Nations Regional Office for Arab States for Disaster Risk Reduction organized a webinar on 7 May 2020 to discuss possible ways for businesses to recover from COVID 19 consequences in the Arab countries. The webinar shed the light on the

UN Resolutions

News and events

Rendering of Southwest Resiliency Park. (Photo: UNISDR)
The United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction has designated the City of Hoboken, New Jersey, USA, as a Role Model City of the Making Cities Resilient campaign for its flood risk management practices. These include plans to retain over a million gallons of stormwater runoff through green infrastructure.
Strategies can be developed as part of an overall vision to make cities of all sizes more resilient and liveable. (Photo: Magnus Larsson)
This week’s UN Climate Summit has generated commitments to raise $2 billion of in-kind and direct support for cities threatened by extreme weather events fuelled by climate change.
During the course, students Thomas Hrabal and Joseph DeLorenzo present their research on disaster resilience measures in Point Pleasant, New Jersey. (Photo: UNISDR)
Eighteen students at Saint Peter’s University in Jersey City, New Jersey, United States, have just completed the university’s first-ever course on disaster risk reduction, in part as a result of Hurricane Sandy which killed at least 117 people and caused $65 billion worth of damage in the US alone.
This new initiative brings together leading names in business, investment, insurance, the public sector, business education and civil society to develop global standards and promote risk-sensitive investment.
Following on a statement by the UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon that “economic losses are out of control and can only be reduced in partnership with the private sector,” the UN Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR) today launched the R!SE Initiative to mainstream disaster risk management into corporate planning and investment decision-making.
UN Photo/Eskinder Debebe
The vital role of cities as engines of climate resilience has been recognised with the appointment of the former mayor of New York City, Michael R. Bloomberg, as Special Envoy for Cities and Climate Change, by United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon.
<b>Building resilience: </b>A Bangladeshi woman helps in community efforts of flood prevention. Her government and others are looking at the Sustainable Development Goals as an opportunity to transform development.
“Disaster risk reduction should not be seen only as an imperative to protecting investments in development, but also as an opportunity for a transformative shift towards resilient development.” This rousing statement from disaster-prone Bangladesh was one of several calls from governments for disaster and climate risk considerations to be incorporated at every stage of development. The seventh session of the Open Working Group on Sustainable Development Goals heard consistent support for the integration of disaster risk management within each sector that may be addressed by the goals, such as poverty eradication, energy, health, food security.
<b>A changing city: </b>New York Air National Guard respond after Sandy, which has prompted a major review of the city's disaster management.
Exactly a year ago, Sandy proved to be the most destructive hurricane of the 2012 Atlantic hurricane season, severely impacting lives and economies in seven countries. For the United States, it was the second-costliest hurricane in its history and affected the entire eastern seaboard, causing an alarming economic bill of up to $50 billion. New York City was one of the worst affected. On the anniversary of Hurricane Sandy this week, however, the city appears occupied with its future rather than its past. Heeding the signs of a changing climate, in June this year, New York City released its plan to protect the city from coastal hazards and climate change impacts called A Stronger, More Resilient New York.
The cast of the off-Broadway Theater Breaking Through Barriers premiered their play 'Ready, Willing and Able' at the UNISDR's New York celebrations for the 2013 International Day for Disatser Reduction.
The 2013 International Day for Disaster Reduction has seen remarkable efforts by artists and the creative community at large to rally for an inclusive and resilient world.
UNISDR Chief, Margareta Wahlström, made a special plea this week for improved data collection in disaster situations in order to provide a better insight into disability-related injuries. In parallel with high-level proceedings at the United Nations General Assembly, leading disability and disaster risk reduction advocates came together in New York to share lessons from disasters past.
The Conference of States Parties to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities is the only human rights treaty of this millennium.
Why are persons with disabilities so disproportionately affected by disasters? This was the important, if often overlooked, question presented to the largest international meeting on disability issues, at the United Nations last week. The answer, simply put, is because disaster prevention measures are designed and implemented in many parts of the world without including or taking into account persons with disabilities. Often it is the attitude of viewing such persons as victims or burdens that prevents their inclusion.