Overview

The UNDRR liaison office in Japan works closely with the Japanese Government and other institutions that have extensive experience and expertise in disaster risk reduction (DRR) to support other partners around the world to reduce disaster risk and build resilience.

The office looks after the Sendai Framework Voluntary Commitments online platform so that non-governmental stakeholders can also contribute to and be recognised for their efforts in implementing the Sendai Framework. 

The office also promotes collaboration with Japan-based institutions such as government agencies, academic and research institutions, the private sector, and civil societies, facilitating their contribution to global and regional DRR efforts and linking their experiences, technology and innovation to other countries’ and regions’ needs.

Contact us

DRI-East 5F
1-5-2 Wakinohama-Kaigan-dori
Chuo-ku
Hyogo
651-0073
Kobe-City, Japan
Phone: +81 782625550
undrr-japan@un.org

News and events

350 students from 11 countries took part in the forum on disaster risk reduction during the National Model United Nations (Photo: UNISDR)
Hundreds of university students from around the world have set their sights on reducing the risk of disasters, during the first-ever edition in Japan of the National Model United Nations.
The High School Students Summit saw 360 participants from 30 countries spotlight the issue of reducing tsunami risk (Photo: UNISDR)
Hundreds of high school students from around the world have pledged to step up efforts to reduce disaster risk, at a global gathering held to mark the first edition of World Tsunami Awareness Day.
UNISDR Private Sector Alliance for Disaster Resilient Societies (ARISE) members in Japan pose for a photo with UNISDR’s head, Mr. Robert Glasser (Photo: UNISDR)
The role of the private sector in making societies resilient to disasters and ensuring development is sustainable has been spotlighted as part of events commemorating the fifth anniversary of the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami.
The head of UNISDR, Mr. Robert Glasser, speaking with children from the Tohoku region of Japan, who survived the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami
This week last year the Third UN World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction was preparing to adopt the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction on March 18, 2014. The new head of UNISDR, Mr. Robert Glasser, has just paid his first visit to Sendai.
The Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami remains a stark reminder of the risk of complex disasters (Photo: Toshiharu Kato / Japanese Red Cross Society)
The head of the UN Office for Disaster Risk Reduction, Mr. Robert Glasser, today attended the fifth anniversary memorial service for those who lost their lives in the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami of March 11, 2011.
The annual International Recovery Forum took place in Kobe, Japan
The International Recovery Platform was established after the 2nd UN World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction in 2005 to support implementation of the Hyogo Framework for Action. The Sendai Framework has given it a new lease of life with a focus on sharing experience and lessons associated with build-back-better.
The first World Tsunami Awareness Day will take place on November 5, 2016
The head of the UN Office for Disaster Risk Reduction, Margareta Wahlström, today welcomed the passing of a resolution yesterday by the UN General Assembly which recognizes November 5 as World Tsunami Awareness Day. The resolution was led by Japan and Chile.
Members of the new ARISE network in Japan (Photo: UNISDR)
Japanese members of the UNISDR Private Sector Alliance for Disaster Resilient Societies, known for short as ARISE, are moving ahead with implementation of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, the global blueprint for reducing disaster losses adopted at a UN conference in Japan earlier this year.
(From left) SRSG Ms. Margareta Wahlström, Mr. Masayuki Hayashi from Toyama Prefectural government, and Mr. Mitsuo Fukuda from Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, and Transport in the area of the main Shiraiwa Sabo Dam in Tateyama Sabo Facilities. (Photo: UNISDR)
The world’s first hybrid dam, combining both earth and concrete, is also earthquake proof and protects millions of people living on Japan’s vulnerable Toyama plain from a repetition of a major disaster which occurred there in the mid-19th century.
A group discussion in Dhaka on recovery planning among government officials, Fire Service & Civil Defence Directorate of Bangladesh and IRP (Photo: IRP)
Bangladesh, one of the most hazard-prone and climate-vulnerable countries in the world, is widely recognised as a leader in tackling the threat of disasters. Policymakers and practitioners in the South Asian nation are ramping up their efforts to make their country even more resilient as they move to implement the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction.
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DRR in Japan

The Hyogo prefecture went through a dramatic recovery process after the Great Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake (the Kobe Earthquake) in January 1995, that killed more than 6,400 people. Through the experiences and lessons learned, Hyogo led research, education and international cooperation on DRR. 

In January 2005, the World Conference on Disaster Reduction (WCDR) was organized by UNDRR (then ISDR) in Kobe, where more than 168 Governments adopted the “Hyogo Framework for Action 2005-2015: building the resilience of nations and communities to disasters” (HFA). The ten-year plan served as the main policy guidance for countries to develop policies on disaster risk reduction.

Building on this process, “The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030" was adopted as the HFA’s successor at the Third UN World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction (WCDRR), held in Sendai in March 2015.