Overview

The UNDRR liaison office in Japan works closely with the Japanese Government and other institutions that have extensive experience and expertise in disaster risk reduction (DRR) to support other partners around the world to reduce disaster risk and build resilience.

The office looks after the Sendai Framework Voluntary Commitments online platform so that non-governmental stakeholders can also contribute to and be recognised for their efforts in implementing the Sendai Framework. 

The office also promotes collaboration with Japan-based institutions such as government agencies, academic and research institutions, the private sector, and civil societies, facilitating their contribution to global and regional DRR efforts and linking their experiences, technology and innovation to other countries’ and regions’ needs.

Contact us

DRI-East 5F
1-5-2 Wakinohama-Kaigan-dori
Chuo-ku
Hyogo
651-0073
Kobe-City, Japan
Phone: +81 782625550
undrr-japan@un.org

News and events

(c)Dwi Oblo/ASB Indonesia and the Philippines. Two members of a Disabled People's Organisation (DPO), wearing khaki vests, are delivering a hygiene promotion session for community members of Mantikole Village, Sigi, Central Sulawesi, Indonesia
The Sendai Framework Voluntary Commitment (SFVC) first Synthesis and Analysis Report was launched in Geneva during the recent Global Platform. Voluntary Commitments (VCs) are made by multiple stakeholders (private sector, local governments, civil society organizations, academia, media, etc.) in support of the implementation of the Sendai Framework, the global roadmap for reducing disaster loses by 2030.
Organizations working to build resilience are submitting voluntary commitments in support of the Sendai Framework, the global roadmap for reducing disaster losses by 2030. If your organization is working on Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR), make a voluntary commitment to show case your efforts and highlight your achievements.
Organizations working on Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) have started to log their voluntary commitments in support of the Sendai Framework - the global roadmap for reducing disaster losses by 2030 - in a new online platform. More than 50 users have registered in the first few weeks of operation. In addition, the platform has already received the first submissions of voluntary commitments by organizations working in DRR. In close coordination with these organizations, UNISDR reviews the submissions before publishing them in the platform.
A screenshot from the voluntary commitment platform which will be launched on 31 December 2018.
The United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction is launching an online platform which allows partners to log their voluntary commitments towanrds implementation of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction.
Group photo of participants at the 2nd World Tsunami Museum Conference
Japan hosted the 2nd World Tsunami Museum Conference which attracted 156 participants from 17 countries to help raise awareness of tsunami risk.
UNISDR head, Mami Mizutori, addressing the High School Students Summit for World Tsunami Awareness Day
For the third year, Japan hosted a High School Students Summit to mark World Tsunami Awareness Day. UNISDR head, Mami Mizutori, urged them to become youth ambassdors for disaster risk reduction.
UNISDR head, Mami Mizutori, speaking at the GEO-XV Plenary
The UN Secretary-General's Special Representative for Disaster Risk Reduction, Mami Mizutori, gave the keynote speech at the GEO-XV Plenary as part of GEO Week 2018, in Kyoto, Japan yesterday.
Noriyuki Suzuki who lost his daughter Mai in the 2011 tsunami shows UNISDR head, Mami Mizutori, a photo of the Okawa school clock which stopped at the time the tsunami hit. 74 children and ten teachers lost their lives at the school.
The head of UNISDR, Mami Mizutori, visited tsunami-affected areas on her first visit to Japan since her appointment as UN Special Representative for Disaster Risk Reduction.
Japan ARISE members and UNISDR staff at the annual symposium held before the commemoration of the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami
A study of the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami has emphasized the importance of economic recovery to the well-being of communities in the post-disaster phase.
Participants at the first ever World Tsunami Museum Conference hosted by Japan earlier this month (Photo: UNISDR)
Directors and representatives from eight museums and organizations around the world, recently came together with government officials in the Japanese city of Ishigaki in Okinawa for the first ever World Tsunami Museum Conference.
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Publications

This is a summary report of the Experts Meeting which was organized on January 16 to verify the progress made in recovery efforts implemented in tsunami- and earthquake-hit regions and to come up with concrete measures to achieve better recovery. The Experts Meeting comprised three thematic group discussions, on “Housing” “Livelihood” and “Organizational and Institutional Arrangements,” for a recovery with a view to build back better as well as a plenary session.

DRR in Japan

The Hyogo prefecture went through a dramatic recovery process after the Great Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake (the Kobe Earthquake) in January 1995, that killed more than 6,400 people. Through the experiences and lessons learned, Hyogo led research, education and international cooperation on DRR. 

In January 2005, the World Conference on Disaster Reduction (WCDR) was organized by UNDRR (then ISDR) in Kobe, where more than 168 Governments adopted the “Hyogo Framework for Action 2005-2015: building the resilience of nations and communities to disasters” (HFA). The ten-year plan served as the main policy guidance for countries to develop policies on disaster risk reduction.

Building on this process, “The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030" was adopted as the HFA’s successor at the Third UN World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction (WCDRR), held in Sendai in March 2015.